Step 10: Interpreting and Using the Data

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Using the data is the most important part of the process, and yet often is the most neglected. This can occur when no one takes ownership of this final step. This step requires a collaboration between the survey team and operational staff and senior management. The operational staff and managers to be involved in this step should have been identified and talked to at the start of the process when discussing how the data will be used. Now it is time to bring them back in.

The survey team will help the operational staff and managers to understand and interpret the results of the survey.

Interpreting the results

Quintiles provide you with a nuanced and clear picture of the wealth levels of your clients. If your clients were just like the national population, then 20% would fall into each national wealth quintile. Your clients’ wealth levels may be skewed towards the poorer end of the population or the richer end.

This client population is similar to the general population
This client population is relatively poor compared to the general population
This client population is relatively wealthy compared to the general population
This client population is poor relative to the general population, but not the poorest of the poor

How you interpret the results you get will depend on what your goals are. For example, your social franchise may be aiming to serve the second and third quintiles, allowing government health services to focus on the poorest quintile.

In general, most social franchises are aiming to serve the relatively poor, so it can be useful to look at the percentage of clients falling into the bottom two national wealth quintiles. This is the global metric of equity selected by the Social Franchise Metrics Working Group.

If more than 40% of your clients fall into the bottom two wealth quintiles, it would mean that your franchise is serving a disproportionately large number of poor clients – which would indicate some degree of success in reaching the poor. If less than 40% of your clients fall into the bottom two wealth quintiles, it would mean that your programme is serving a disproportionately small number of poor clients, indicating that it is not targeting services at the poorest groups

Sub-groups
Step 9b: Analysing with SPSS and STATA